Audio: Bob Dylan, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – Australia 1986 – Full Show – ‘Positively 4th Street, ‘I’m Alright, Ma’ & Many More

Bob Dylan backed by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, True Confessions Tour, Sydney, Australia, Feb. 24, 1986. 

Set List:

01 Justine (Don Harris/Dewy Terry)
02 Positively 4th Street
03 Clean Cut Kid
04 I’ll Remember You
05 Trust Yourself
06 That Lucky Old Sun (Gillespie/ Smith)
07 Masters of War
08 Bye Bye Johnny [Petty]
09 Straight Into Darkness [Petty]
10 A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall (acoustic – Dylan solo)
11 Girl Of the North Country (acoustic – Dylan solo)
12 It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) (acoustic – Dylan solo)
13 I Forgot More Than You’ll Ever Know (Null)
14 Just Like a Woman
15 I’m Moving On (Hank Snow)
16 Lenny Bruce
17 When the Night Comes Falling From the Sky
18 Lonesome Town
19 Ballad of a Thin Man
20 So You Wanna Be a Rock-n-Roll Star [Petty]
21 Refugee [Petty]
22 Rainy Day Women #12 & 35
23 Seeing the Real You at Last
24 Across the Borderline (Cooder/Hiatt)
25 I and I
26 Like a Rolling Stone
27 In the Garden
28 Blowin’ in the Wind
29 Uranium Rock (Warren Smith)
30 Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in a recent issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

Video: Lucinda Williams Rocks New Song, ‘Protection,’ on ‘Fallon’ – Watch Right Now!

The great Lucinda Williams was on “Fallon” last night and performed a seriously great track off her new two-CD album, “Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone.”

The album was released today and it’s a winner. If you dig Lucinda, you need it.

Check out this killer live version of “Protection”:

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in a recent issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

Audio: Bob Dylan’s Rare Mono ‘Rocks And Gravel’ – Freewheelin’ Sessions Rock Version – 1962

T”Rocks And Gravel” is an interesting recording that Bob Dylan made for The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan.

It was originally included on the album along three other songs which were all replaced.

What’s interesting is that the year is 1962 and yet Dylan is accompanied by drums, piano, bass and lead guitar.

Bob Dylan – Rocks And Gravel (1962):

Rocks And Gravel (Solid Road) (mx. CO 76986-2) by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

Also cut from the album:

Bob Dylan – Talkin’ John Birch Society (1962):

Talkin John Birch Paranoid Blues by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

Bob Dylan – Let Me Die In My Footsteps (1962):


Bob Dylan – Let me die in my footsteps by perostoppogno

Let Me Die In My Footsteps by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

Bob Dylan – Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Willie (1962):

Ramblin' Gamblin' Willie by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone ran a great review of my book in a recent issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

Audio: Brian Eno Curates Fela Vinyl Box Set #3 – Listen to Live ‘Colonial Mentality’ Right Now! Plus More

Brian Eno, who curates the new Fela Anikulakpo Kuti box set, says Fela’s music changed his life:

“Before about mid-September 1973 I didn’t have much interest in polyrhythmic music. I didn’t really get it. That all changed one autumn day when I walked into Stern’s Record Shop off Tottenham Court Road. For reasons I’ve long forgotten, I left the store with an album that was to change my life dramatically. It was Afrodisiac by Fela Ransome-Kuti (as he was then known) and his band The Africa 70. I remember the first time I listened and how dazzled I was by the groove and the rhythmic complexity, and by the raw, harsh sounds of the brass, like Mack trucks hurtling across highways with their horns blaring. Everything I thought I knew about music at that point was up in the air again. The sheer force and drive of this wild Nigerian stuff blew my mind. My friend Robert Wyatt called it ‘Jazz from another planet’ – and suddenly I thought I understood the point of jazz, until then an almost alien music to me.”

Fela has been called the “Bob Dylan of Africa.”

Maybe his music will change your life too!

Check out this live version of the late African musical legend’s “Colonial Mentality,” recorded at the New Afrika Shine in Fela’s hometown of Lagos. The track features Femi Kuti on sax.

Below is a player loaded with an interview with Alex Gibney who directed the new film “Finding Fela,” the live recording of “Colonial Mentality,” “Lover,” “Power Show” and “Zombie” from FELA! Original Broadway Cast.

The title track off the Fela album Zombie:

“Mr. Follow Follow” off the Fela album Zombie:

Fela Kuti Live in Berlin – Berliner Jazztage 1978:

Listen to more here.

Info about the film “Finding Fela” here.

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post –

Why Every Serious Dylan Fan Should Care About the Greil Marcus Curated Festival Albertine!

A still from Olivier Assayas’ “Après- Mai.”

When Bob Dylan arrived in New York in January 1961, he found himself in a cultural paradise, a city that offered him access to art and music and film that he could only have read about back in Hibbing, Minnesota.

But he had always been curious about the world.

According to Dylan in his autobiography, “Chronicles Volume One,” back in Hibbing he’d already been absorbing a fantastic amount of culture, reading “Voltaire, Rousseau, John Locke, Montesquieu, Martin Luther – visionaries, revolutionaries … it was like I knew those guys, like they’d been living in my backyard.”

Thelonious Monk, “Misterioso”:

He’d seen 100s of films and already had an encyclopedia of music in his head. Sure there were all the folk and blues and country records he’d heard, and many live performances he’d attended (Slim Whitman, Hank Snow, Web Pierce and others), but he’d listened to rock ‘n’ roll and jazz too. And pop music and classical!

As Dylan recounts in Chronicles, once he got to New York he had the opportunity to stretch even further. He saw Fellini films and hung out with Thelonious Monk at the Blue Note and attended performances by many jazz legends, read the poetry of Rimbaud and Baudelaire and Ginsberg and so many others, and even saw Jean Genet’s play, The Balcony.

Trailer for Fellini’s
“8 1/2″:

And he was still reading all the time: Robert Graves, Thucydides, Gogol, Balzac, Maupassant, Dickens, Dante and so many more.

It was not a narrow focus on folk music and on playing folk songs that allowed Bob Dylan to become one of the greatest artists.

No, it was his wide-ranging curiosity. Dylan has a curious mind that constantly seeks out and absorbs new information from wide-ranging and eclectic sources.

The point I’m making is that Dylan exposed himself (and continues to expose himself) to a all kinds of new information. All of that forms the backdrop for his own unique art.

And this leads me to Festival Albertine, a six-night event curated by arguably the leading Dylan expert, Greil Marcus.

“Engrenages” – Season 1 – Trailer:

Marcus’ worldview is certainly informed by his love of Dylan, who he was been listening to and writing about since the ‘60s. Marcus has written three books about Dylan, including his “Basement Tapes” masterpiece, “The Old, Weird America.”

Next month, Festival Albertine will take place from October 14 through October 19 in New York, and videos of the panel discussions will be available for all to see at the Albertine website after the festival ends.

This festival itself, like Marcus’ own approach to writing about culture and history, reminds me of Dylan’s curious mind.

Marcus has reached out to radical French filmmakers and experimental novelists, a Foucoult expert, and the genius mathematician John Nash, TV show auteurs and rock, film and book critics, fashion experts and screenwriters, graphic novel creators and political science professors, and organized a wide-ranging series of panels on topics ranging from “Extremist Fiction in Ordinary Language” to “Olivier Assayas in the Post-May Period.”

All of them and more will be at Festival Albertine.

The trailer for “Après- Mai”:

For more about the festival, please check out my previous post on it here.

If you care about Bob Dylan, you should care about Greil Marcus, and if you care about Greil Marcus, you should care about Festival Albertine.

Enough said.

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

Video: The Libertines Rock Alexandra Palace, Sept. 2014 – ‘You’re My Waterloo,’ ‘Can’t Stand Me Now’ & Many More

A selection of fan clips from The Libertines shows at Alexandra Palace in London on September 27 and 28, 2014.

Enjoy.

The Libertines at Alexandra Palace.

The Libertines – Vertigo – Alexandra Palace, London – September 2014:

The Libertines – Can’t Stand Me Now – Alexandra Palace, London – September 2014:

The Libertines – What Became Of The Likely Lads – Alexandra Palace, London – September 2014:

The Libertines – Music When the Lights Go Out – Alexandra Palace, London – September 2014:

The Libertines – Don’t Look Back Into The Sun – Alexandra Palace, London – September 2014:

The Libertines – Can’t Stand Me Now (excerpt) live at Alexandra Palace 27th September 2014:

The Libertines – You’re My Waterloo – Alexandra Palace Saturday 27th September 2014:

The Libertines – The Delaney (excerpt) – Alexandra Palace Saturday 27th September 2014:

The Libertines – Fuck Forever (28.09.14):

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post –http://youtu.be/qFr6NqtymcA?list=UU_veq_53r4HVtsFdZT6aDtg

Audio: Bob Dylan’s ’50th Anniversary Collection: The Copyright Extension Collection, Volume 1′ – Freewheelin’ Rarities, Part Two

In 2012, in order to protect the copyrights on a bunch of Bob Dylan recordings that have not been officially released, Sony released a very limited edition of a multi-disk set called The 50th Anniversary Collection: The Copyright Extension Collection, Volume 1.

Among the gems on the album are many outtakes and alternate takes of songs recorded for The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan.

The other day I posted ten clips here.

Today I’ve got ten more.

Enjoy while you can.

Bob Dylan – Wichita (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Hero Blues (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Goin’ Down To New Orleans (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Milk Cow’s Calf’s Blues (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Kingsport Town (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Bob Dylan’s Blues (Freewheelin’ Alternate Take 1962):

Bob Dylan – I Shall Be Free (Freewheelin’ Alternate Take 1962):

Bob Dylan – Lonesome Whistle Blues (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Worried Blues (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Ballad Of Hollis Brown (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Baby Please Don’t Go (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post –http://youtu.be/qFr6NqtymcA?list=UU_veq_53r4HVtsFdZT6aDtg

Culture Critic Greil Marcus Curates Ambitious French-American Festival Albertine – Mary Gaitskill, Percival Everett & Many More!

Mary Gaitskill will appear on a panel at Festival Albertine.

The culture critic (and Bob Dylan expert) Greil Marcus has organized a stunning French-American “intellectual exchange” in the form of the six-day Festival Albertine which will take place from October 14 through October 19, 2014, at the new Albertine bookshop in New York.

All of the panels will be videotaped and made available online via the bookstore’s website, http://www.albertine.com, after the festival so that those who cannot attend can see them.

Marcus has always moved smoothly through highbrow and popular culture, and the festival reflects that. Novelists and graphic novelists, movie directors and TV show auteurs, economics professors and fashion designers, French and American historians and rock, book and film critics will take part in the festival.

Novelist Percival Everett, author of “Erasure.”

The lineup for the six evenings includes: Novelists Mary Gaitskill (“Two Girls, Fat and Thin”) and Percival Everett (“Erasure”), director Olivier Assayas (“Après- Mai”), Joseph Stiglitz (“Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy”), Marjane Satrapi (“Persepolis”), the mathematician John Nash, TV show creators Alexandra Clert (“Engrenages”) and Matthew Weiner (“Mad Men”), historians Françoise Mélonio and Arthur Goldhammer and others.

For info about specific panels and the schedule, head over to the Albertine website.

Although there is no panel devoted directly to rock music, a number of the panelists are or have been immersed in the music. In addition to Marcus, there is former New York Times chief rock critic John Rockwell, former Newsweek pop critic James Miller, “Streets of Fire” screenwriter Larry Gross, and Mary Davis (author of “Classic Chic: Music, Fashion and Modernism”).

Marjane Satrapi, the creator of “Persepolis.”

Albertine opened its doors yesterday (September 27, 2014). The book store and the festival, named after Proust’s muse, Albertine, are the brainchild of French diplomat Antonin Baudry, cultural counselor of the French Embassy in the United States, and, using the pen name Abel Lanzac, co-author of the graphic novel “Quai d’Orsay.”

In an essay that explains why the need for Albertine, Baudry wrote:

“Her naissance is important because so many books were missing in New York, the very heart of the world, before she arrived. Her presence will matter because there are essential ideas to uncover and crucial debates to be had between the old Continent and the new. In the 21st Century, without considering perspectives from near and far, should we be so confident in our definitions of good, evil, beauty; fairness on the battlefield, justice; a good society, a good life, or even literature?

“One can answer each of these questions on his or her own, but to collectively attack them and examine each of their nuances—and from points of view illuminated by the insight of foreign lights—will lead us further. The world is in rapid flux. As new powers emerge or re-emerge on the political, economic and intellectual realms, their presence inspires us to reinforce deep existing friendships. For friendship is always more valuable, precious and rare in complex and dangerous times than during periods of calm and certainty.”

The book store currently contains 14,000 books including, according to the Albertine website, “contemporary and classic titles from 30 French-speaking countries in genres including novels, non-fiction, art, comic, or children’s books.” Visitors are welcome to find a comfortable chair and read any of them.

To get the French-American debate — what he calls the “French-American intellectual exchange” — underway, Baudry decided to kick things off with a festival and enlisted Marcus to curate the week-long event.

“Antonin read [Marcus' landmark books] ‘The Shape of Things to Come’– as ‘L’Amerique et ses prophètes,’ the French title — and ‘Lipstick Traces,'” Marcus said when asked how he came to curate the festival. “I’d never been asked to do something like it, unless you count co-editing ‘A New Literary History of America.'”

Olivier Assayas, director of Après- Mai.

In his essay explaining the need for the bookstore and festival, Baudry detailed why he chose Greil Marcus to curate it:

Our first question was, Who should curate and shape this debate? We made two decisions concerning this choice—decisions that mirror the entire vision of the Albertine experience. Firstly, the curator must be an American, and secondly, it must be Greil Marcus. Why an American—and not a French person—to curate a French festival at the French Embassy? Because that is the essence of a true dialogue. For Festival Albertine’s to be fruitful in America, speakers must be selected by American ears, eyes and intelligence. And these ears, eyes and this intelligence had to be Greil’s.

Greil Marcus’ masterful work defines him as one of the most relevant and stimulating living thinkers of America. Greil touches the foundational issues of society. Along with many of his books, The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice addresses questions and issues so fundamental
to America that it perfectly sets the stage for deep analysis of our cultures in comparison. Greil’s texts deliver the intellectual keys to unlock channels of transatlantic dialogue, discussion, and compelling debate.

Moreover, Greil is the founder of a true analytic method. He offers both a broader and more precise conception of history in Lipstick Traces when he writes, “and what is history, anyway? Is history simply a matter of events that leave behind those things that can be weighed and measured – new institutions, new maps, new rulers, new winners and losers–or is it also the result of moments that seem to leave nothing behind, nothing but the mystery of spectral connections between people long separated by place and time, but somehow speaking the same language?”

The bookstore is located in the French embassy. At http://www.albertine.com is this history of the historic building:

Albertine is housed in the official landmark Payne Whitney mansion in Manhattan. In 1902, former Standard Oil Company treasurer Oliver Hazard Payne commissioned the Italian Renaissance mansion as a wedding gift to his nephew Payne Whitney. Between 1902 and 1906, Stanford White, the famed architect of the Washington Square Arch, designed and oversaw construction of the mansion. Since 1952, the mansion has housed the Cultural Services of the French Embassy. The bookshop within the mansion was born in 2014, and its interiors were created by celebrated French designer Jacques Garcia (Chateau du Champ de Bataille in Normandy, France and The NoMad Hotel in New York City)… in the model of a grand private French library. The two-floor space includes a reading room and inviting nooks furnished with lush sofas and armchairs.

I asked Marcus what ten books he would suggest someone planning to attend the festival or watch the videos should read.

The list:

Olivier Assayas, “A Post-May Adolescence”

Joseph Stiglitz, “Freefall: America, Free Markets and the Sinking of the World Economy”

James Miller, “The Passion of Michel Foucault”

May Davis, “Classic Chic: Music, Fashion and Modernism”

Marjane Satrapi, “Persepolis”

Antonin Baudry aka Abel Lanzac, “Weapons of Mass Diplomacy”

Emmanuel Carrère, “The Moustache” and “Limonov”

Mary Gaitskill, “Two Girls, Fat and Thin”

Percival Everett, “Erasure”

[Note: I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

Audio: Bob Dylan’s ’50th Anniversary Collection: The Copyright Extension Collection, Volume 1′ – Freewheelin’ Rarities, Part One

In 2012, in order to protect the copyrights on a bunch of Bob Dylan recordings that have not been officially released, Sony released a very limited edition of a multi-disk set called The 50th Anniversary Collection: The Copyright Extension Collection, Volume 1.

Among the gems on the album are many outtakes and alternate takes of songs recorded for The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan.

Today I’ve got ten of them, with more to come soon.

Enjoy while you can.

Bob Dylan – Corrina Corrina (Freewheelin’ Alternate Take 1962):

Bob Dylan – Sally Gal (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Willie (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Blowin’ In The Wind (Freewheelin’ Alternate Take 1962):

Bob Dylan – Mixed Up Confusion (Freewheelin’ Alternate Take 1962):

Bob Dylan – That’s Alright Mama (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Babe, I’m In The Mood For You (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Rocks And Gravel (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – Whatcha Gonna Do? (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

Bob Dylan – The Death Of Emmett Till (Freewheelin’ Outtake 1962):

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

A MESSAGE FROM THOM YORKE AND NIGEL GODRICH (& A New Thom Yorke Album!)

This showed up in my email this morning:

A MESSAGE FROM THOM YORKE AND NIGEL GODRICH

As an experiment we are using a new version of BitTorrent to distribute a new Thom Yorke record.

The new Torrent files have a pay gate to access a bundle of files..

The files can be anything, but in this case is an ‘album’.

It’s an experiment to see if the mechanics of the system are something that the general public can get its head around …

If it works well it could be an effective way of handing some control of internet commerce back to people who are creating the work.

Enabling those people who make either music, video or any other kind of digital content to sell it themselves.

Bypassing the self elected gate-keepers.

If it works anyone can do this exactly as we have done.

The torrent mechanism does not require any server uploading or hosting costs or ‘cloud’ malarkey.

It’s a self-contained embeddable shop front…

The network not only carries the traffic, it also hosts the file. The file is in the network.

Oh yes and it’s called

Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes.

Thom Yorke & Nigel Godrich

You can get the album for $6 here.

You can watch a video for the track “A Brain In A Bottle” Here.

Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes Tracks:

01 A Brain In A Bottle.mp3
02 Guess Again!.mp3
03 Interference.mp3
04 The Mother Lode.mp3
05 Truth Ray.mp3
06 There Is No Ice (For My Drink).mp3
07 Pink Section.mp3
08 Nose Grows Some.mp3

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

Thom Yorke & Nigel Godrich