Bob Dylan To Release New Album, ‘Shadows In The Night,’ in 2015

Cover of Bob Dylan’s upcoming 2015 album.

Bob Dylan’s next album will be titled Shadows In The Night, and released in 2015, according to an insert included in Dylan’s new boxed set, The Basement Tapes Complete: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11.

In May of this year, Bob Dylan released a cover of Frank Sinatra’s 1945 hit “Full Moon and Empty Arms” on his website.

“Full Moon and Empty Arms”:

“Full Moon and Empty Arms” was written by Ted Mossmann and Buddy Kaye and based around Sergei Rachmaninoff’s 1901 composition “Piano Concert No. 2 in C Minor.”

Also on Dylan’s site was what looked like an album cover, a mostly black and blue image with a picture of Dylan and the words: “Bob Dylan Shadows In The Night.”

The retro nature of “Full Moon And Empty Arms,” sparked speculation that Dylan’s next studio album of new recordings would be a cover album of standards.

​”This track ["Full Moon And Empty Arms"] is definitely from a forthcoming album due later on this year,” a spokesperson for the singer who wouldn’t confirm the title told Rolling Stone in May.

A month later a source who has heard the album enthused about it to me. “It really is a great album,” my source said, offering no additional details.

Obviously plans changed, and it was announced earlier this year that most of Dylan and The Band’s Basement Tapes recordings would be released as Dylan’s next album. The Basement Tapes Complete: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11, a 6-CD set (as well as a 2-CD version of highlights), will be released on Tuesday, November 4.

Now, based on an insert in the box that The Basement Tapes Complete: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11, comes in, I can tell you that the title of Dylan’s next album is Shadows In The Night,, that it will be released in 2015 and that for now at least, the Shadows In The Night image seen on Dylan’s website is the cover (unless of course something changes).

No track listing has been released.

In addition to “Full Moon and Empty Arms,” which is still expected to be on the album, Jerome Moross and Carolyn Leigh’s “Stay With Me,” which was recorded by Frank Sinatra in December 1963 and released a month later, could be included.

Dylan performed “Stay With Me” for the the first time the other night at the Dolby Theater in Los Angeles. So this is speculation. There is no confirmation that “Stay With Me” will be on the album. “Stay With Me” was the main theme of the Otto Preminger film “The Cardinal.”

“Stay With Me” as performed at the Dolby Theater, October 26, 2014.

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in a recent issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

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Video/Audio: Bob Dylan & Tom Waits on ‘Family Guy'; Tom Waits Sends Audio Oddities To Bob Dylan

Some might find this silly, which it is, but it’s kinda funny too. Caricatures of Bob Dylan and Tom Waits on the cartoon, “Family Guy”:

As Bob Dylan tells it, he would let Tom Waits know in advance about the theme of an upcoming “Theme Time Radio Hour” and soon enough a cassette would arrive in the mail from Waits with the eccentric singer offering up some obscure but relevant info. Hear Waits talk about carrier pigeons, sacred body parts in rural China, the roots of the expression “baker’s dozen” and more.

Listen to Dylan and Waits:

[Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in a recent issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

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PopMatters Gives ‘True Love Scars’ a Rave Review – ‘a whirlwind tale of a young music fanatic’s quest’

Yesterday the pop culture site PopMatters, posted a terrific review of my novel “True Love Scars.”

PopMatters contributing editor Greg M. Schwartz writes:

…the novel is a whirlwind tale of a young music fanatic’s quest for true love, high times and “the authentic real” (not necessarily in that order).

Teenage protagonist Michael Stein, aka “Writerman”, lives in Marin County and longs to be a musician, or at least a music writer. He’s into almost all of the musical icons of the era, especially Bob Dylan. Writerman is obsessed with finding his “Visions of Johanna” chick, who eventually appears in the form of Sweet Sarah. But conflict is ordained from the start. Chapter One begins with Writerman speaking in a sort of fever dream about how he betrayed and lost Sarah and has been on a quest to redeem his crushed soul ever since.

And later in the review, talking about the narrator’s obsession with Bob Dylan, Schwartz writes:

He can analyze those Dylan lyrics all day. He and a girl who’s charmingly fond of speaking in Dylan lyrics pore over Dylan’s albums in a scene from 1965, going over his evolution as an artist. “First time I heard that Dylan song it saved my life,” Writerman says of “Like a Rolling Stone”. It’s a sentiment that speaks for several generations of rock ‘n’ rollers, from those who came of age in Goldberg’s era to the present. They get deep into Dylanology in the scene as Writerman speaks of how Dylan opened his eyes to “how almost nothing is what it appears to be and I think that’s when I got it in my head I got to figure out the authentic real, see the world for what it is and not the facade of delusional humans erect in front of the truth.”

That’s what great rock ‘n’ roll can do, and True Love Scars is deeply dialed in to rock’s dichotomy of enlightening powers versus stonered party time.

Read this excellent review of my novel at the PopMatters website.

[Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in a recent issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

Exclusive! Bob Dylan’s Handwritten Lyrics For ‘New Basement Tapes’ Song, ‘Liberty Street’

Page one of Bob Dylan’s 1967 lyrics to “Liberty Street.”

Yesterday I got access to a copy of Bob Dylan’s two pages of handwritten lyrics for “Liberty Street,” a song completed by Taylor Goldsmith of the band Dawes for the album Lost On the River: The New Basement Tapes (produced by T Bone Burnett).

I like what Dawes has done with the song, creating a piano ballad along the lines of “Dear Landlord.” Dawes’ voice is too smooth for me, and I’d love to hear Dylan sing this one (and bring his distinctive, bluesy approach to the piano part).

Dawes took quite a few liberties with Dylan’s words, only using a portion of the original lyrics, and by leaving out some key lines, turns it into a very different song, which is fine. I’m sure Dylan would dig that. Still, it’s worth noting a few of the missing lines. Dawes used some lines from these verses, as you’ll see:

In one verse, Dylan writes:
“6 months in Kansas City, can’t find no room and board,
6 months in Kansas City, what can’t lead to what kind of reward,
All my friends in jail lost out,
Some who ain’t got no bail bust out, but then find the tracks did make you come back,
Down on your knees, ain’t it a pity, not even a breeze,
6 months in Kansas City, make a man ready to do anything.”

And the one that follows:
“6 months in Kansas City! Woe! Can’t be begging for no last meal,
Things sure don’t look too pretty! Cause a man to rob and steal
All my friends confounded, indeed
Some lost and some drown and some turn to greed.”

Elvis Costello also took a shot at this one, and I do prefer his version, which he calls “Six Months In Kansas City (Liberty Street),” but that may be because I’m a big Elvis fan. Soon enough you’ll be able to decide for yourself, as the album will be out on November 10.

Goldsmith starts the song with Dylan’s second line, “He came from the old religion, but possessed no magic skill, Descending from machinery, he left nothing in his will.”

He also uses Dylan’s next two lines — “The crops are failing, the women wailing” — before rewriting Dylan’s first line — “I see by the papers that” — to complete the verse with “it’s in the paper at your feet.”

Although Dylan wrote a couple of possible choruses, Goldsmith made his own using Dylan’s title for the song which appears to have been “Liberty Street (Six Months In Kansas City).”

Goldsmith’s chorus: “Six months in Kansas City, down on Liberty Street.”

The strangest thing Goldsmith does is leave out what to me is a really key pair of lines: “Thank you for not helping me out, for not treating me like a fool.”

Instead, for his next verse Goldsmith jumps to the bottom of the first page and slightly changes Dylan’s lyric to: “It was sad to see it, that little lady goin’ in, arrested for arson, once they’d asked her where she’d been.”

The second page of Dylan’s “Liberty Street” lyrics.

Then he grabs a line from later in the song — “Down on your knees, ain’t it a pity, not even a breeze — and turns it into: “Down on her knees, not even a breeze, another victim of the heat.”

And back to the chorus: “Six months in Kansas City, down on Liberty Street.”

For his final verse, Goldsmith goes to Dylan’s final verse for the lines “Things sure don’t look too pretty, cause a man to rob and steal, I got [unintelligible word] six more months out here, can’t be begging for my meals.”

And turns some lines from the first page — “Now look here Baby Snooks, don’t matter how many books, you got underneath your thumb” — into “Now look here Baby Snooks, doesn’t matter what books, you got underneath your seat,” before ending with “Six months in Kansas City, down on Liberty Street.”

About the song, Goldsmith says in a press release:

“Liberty Street” was one of the last songs I put together for the record. We didn’t see the lyrics for this song until we got into the studio. Bob Dylan has a way of saying lines like ‘Six months in Kansas City down on Liberty Street’ and it having an immediate, yet sometimes ineffable, power. When I started putting these words to music, the structure of the words dictated the way the chords rolled out so it came together really fast. And the recording of it was our first take.”

“Liberty Street”:

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

Video: Stream Another Bob Dylan ‘New Basement Tapes’ Song, ‘Liberty Street’

Today we get another track from Lost On the River: The New Basement Tapes.

This one is titled “Liberty Street.” While the lyrics were written in 1967 by Bob Dylan, the music was written earlier this year by Taylor Goldsmith of the band Dawes.

About the song, Goldsmith say in a press release:

“Liberty Street” was one of the last songs I put together for the record. We didn’t see the lyrics for this song until we got into the studio. Bob Dylan has a way of saying lines like ‘Six months in Kansas City down on Liberty Street’ and it having an immediate, yet sometimes ineffable, power. When I started putting these words to music, the structure of the words dictated the way the chords rolled out so it came together really fast. And the recording of it was our first take.”

“Liberty Street”:

The album will be released on November 10, 2014.

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post –

Audio: Stream More Tracks From Bob Dylan’s ‘Basement Tapes Complete’ – ‘Edge Of The Ocean,’ ‘I Shall Be Released’ & Ten More

Photo by Elliott Landy.

Listen to 12 songs off Bob Dylan’s soon to be released The Basement Tapes Complete: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11 at NPR “First Listen.” The 6-CD box set is out November 4, 2014.

The songs:

Edge Of The Ocean (Disc 1, Track 1)

You Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere (Take 1) (Disc 3, Track 17)

I Shall Be Released (Take 1) (Disc 3, Track 19)

Quinn The Eskimo (Take 1) (Disc 4, Track 4)

This Wheel’s On Fire (Disc 3, Track 21)

Johnny Todd (Disc 2, Track 1)

Don’t Ya Tell Henry (Disc 4, Track 21)

I Don’t Hurt Anymore (Disc 2, Track 19)

Silent Weekend (Disc 5, Track 12)

Crash On The Levee (Take 1) (Disc 3, Track 10)

One Too Many Mornings (Disc 5, Track 2)

I’m Your Teenage Prayer (Disc 2, Track 8)

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

Video: Neil Young, Pearl Jam at 2014 Bridge School Benefit Concert – Oct. 25, 2014 – ‘Mansion On The Hill,’ ‘I Am A Child,’ ‘Hunger Strike’

At this year’s Bridge School Benefit Concert Neil Young was joined by Pearl Jam and others. A highlight for some was a sort-of Temple Of The Dog reunion when Chris Cornell joined Pearl Jam to play “Hunger Strike.”

Check it out plus Pearl Jam and Neil Young singing some other songs.

Neil Young “I Am A Child”:

Fuckin’ Up – Pearl Jam

Temple of the Dog – Chris Cornell & Pearl Jam, “Hunger Strike”:

Another view:

Neil Young with Lukas Nelson from Promise of the Real and Micah Nelson, “Mansion on the Hill”:

Neil Young & friends – “Who’s gonna stand up?”:

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

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Audio: Bob Dylan at the Dolby Theater in Los Angeles, Oct. 25, 2014 – ‘Long & Wasted Years,’ ‘Forgetful Heart’ & More

Bob Dylan played the Dolby Theater in Los Angeles last night. Three songs have surfaced so far.

Check them out.

“High Water (For Charley Patton)”:

“Long and Wasted Years”:

“Forgetful Heart”:

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

Audio: Bob Dylan at Carnegie Hall, 1963 – ‘Seven Curses,’ ‘Percy’s Song,’ ‘Masters of War’ & More

Fifty-one years ago, on October 26, 1963, Bob Dylan performed at Carnegie Hall in New York.

Below you can listen to many of the songs he performed that night.

“The Times They Are A-Changin'”:

The Times They Are A-Changin' by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“Ballad of Hollis Brown”:

Ballad Of Hollis Brown (Live) by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“Boots Of Spanish Leather”:

Boots Of Spanish Leather (Live) by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“Lay Down Your Weary Tune”:

Lay Down Your Weary Tune by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“Percy’s Song”:

“Seven Curses”:

“North Country Blues”:

North Country Blues (Live) by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall”:

Hard Rain's A Gonna Fall (live at Carnegie Hall New York City 1963) by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright”:

Don't Think Twice It's Alright by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“With God On Our Side”:

With God On Our Side by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“Only A Pawn In Their Game”:

Only A Pawn In Their Game by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark
“Masters Of War”:

“The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll”:

The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

“When The Ship Comes In”:

When The Ship Comes In (live at Carnegie Hall New York City 1963) by Bob Dylan on Grooveshark

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post —

R.I.P. Dept.: Cream Bassist Jack Bruce Dead At 71

Cover of Jack Bruce’s first post-Cream solo album.

Jack Bruce, who is best known as the bassist, singer, co-founder and chief songwriter of the ’60s psychedelic blues-rock trio, Cream, died Saturday at his home in Suffolk, England.

He was 71 years old.

In Cream, the group he formed in July 1966 with Eric Clapton and drummer Ginger Backer, Bruce wrote the hits “Sunshine of Your Love,” “White Room” and “I Feel Free.”

Cream recorded four albums — Fresh Cream (1966), Disraeli Gears (1967), Wheels of Fire (1968) and Goodbye (1969) — and broke up in November 1968.

The cause of Bruce’s death has not yet been revealed.

Bruce suffered from liver disease, according to an obit posted on The Guardian‘s website:

Bruce’s life had been marked by health and financial troubles. In the late 1970s he struggled with drug addiction, and worked as a session musician to make money. In 2003 he was diagnosed with liver cancer, and that September he underwent a transplant. His body initially rejected the new liver, and Bruce almost died, but he recovered well enough to return to performance in 2004.

A statement from his family said: “It is with great sadness that we, Jack’s family, announce the passing of our beloved Jack: husband, father and granddad and all-round legend. The world of music will be a poorer place without him, but he lives on in his music and forever in our hearts.”

Read The Guardian obit here.

[I just published my rock 'n' roll novel, True Love Scars." Rolling Stone has a great review of my book in the new issue. Read it here. There's info about True Love Scars here.]

— A Days Of The Crazy-Wild blog post –